Cutting Down the Clouds

This winter they are cutting down our woods more seriously than ever,—Fair Haven Hill, Walden, Linnaea Borealis Wood, etc. etc. Thank God they cannot cut down the clouds! Henry David Thoreau, journal entry, January 21, 1852 “A study just published in the journal Nature Geoscience shows that if we continue with business-as-usual fossil fuel emissions, the atmosphere will hold 1,200 parts per million CO2 in…

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Representative Texts from Hawthorne to Dickinson

In your daily busyness you are pressed for time to think and often choose instead anesthetization – watching any number of “boutique” and highly produced television shows. These may be good, but like most in the “televisual” medium, they are not meant to be indelible. I don’t just cast aspersions outward… Let us choose to think. Here are representative pieces of American Literature (USA) that…

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Between Hope and Defeat, History and Heaven

“God himself culminates in the present moment.” (Thoreau) What is “now” for? What if you “know” the future? Fairy tales and wishes of complete knowledge are always disastrous. If you know the hour of your death you live “against it” or are perhaps completely tugged into the orbit of it. In Climate disruption; in the constant use of fossil fuels and toxins; we “know” a…

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Absolute Solutions Necessary

Only two things to do: 1. zero out carbon emissions 2. exception: all technological and scientific labor exploring new solutions may continue. What we can’t do: continue using electricity; continue “producing” anything. All systems are entangled. “We” also can’t do anything about anyone else’s use of electricity. Globally, we are not going to be able to make any difference. If there is no “will” here,…

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Rachel Carson’s book had no real effect

Facing Global Climate Disruption and the End of Everything All At Once… David Wallace-Wells’ The Uninhabitable Earth tries very hard to critique those who have thrown in the towel and offer some “hope” or optimism. We CAN stop emitting carbon on such a detrimental scale; but we cannot alter the cascading effects of what all our natural “interventions” have created. Massive die-off of so many…

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Bubbles Like a Burning Glass

It takes little effort to find, all throughout the vastness of the digital nowhere, blog posts reproducing the words of Henry David Thoreau, in any season, on any natural or political phenomena. And here too you will discover photos of Walden Pond (I have taken a few of these as well). What I find disheartening always is the little © that often accompanies these photos…

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This is a “Democrat” in Patriarchal America (Indiana version)

Secretary Schellinger is currently a member of the Dean’s Council for IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs; board member for The International Center; and member of Governor Holcomb’s Executive Council on Cybersecurity. Schellinger has served on numerous civic boards including the Indianapolis Capital Improvement Board where he led the new Stadium and Convention Center taskforce, The Archdiocese of Indianapolis Catholic Community Foundation Board, and…

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Interchange: The Future Cannot Be Capitalist: Michael Yates on the Working Class

AUDIO: The Future Cannot Be Capitalist With Covington Catholic High School students offering a fresh examples of the embodied ideologies of Capitalism like racism, patriarchy and ecological destruction – we turn to theories of working class solidarity. If we want a social system that is not alienating—with meaningful labor, with equality in all spheres of life, with true, substantive democracy, with poisons removed for our…

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LeRoi and Ornette – Becoming in Time

I was listening to a PoemTalk (PennSound) about LeRoi (Amiri Baraka) Jones’s early poem “Kenyatta Listening to Mozart” and one of the guests mentioned that Ornette Coleman’s The Shape of Jazz to Come came out in roughly the same year as this poem was written. Coleman’s album is 1959 and the poem was published in 1963. The primary “note” played by this discussion was that of…

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